Pharma Strategy Blog

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Posts tagged ‘entinostat’

After a number of basic research and science sessions over the last two days (see the Update 1 post on the science that intrigued me for more details), but the last two days heralded some excellent clinical sessions, in both oral and poster forms. These included the presentation of the much anticipated update to the BOLERO-2 trial, which was also published in the New England Journal of Medicine online and the CLEOPATRA study, also published in the same journal.  One of the more impressive posters that caught my eye was the ENCORE 301 study, which provided an update to the entinostat data in ER/PR+ HER2- advanced breast cancer.

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Last week I had an enjoyable time at the AACR-EORTC-NCI Molecular Targets meeting but gippy wifi in San Francisco followed by my blog hosting and RSS feed going haywire meant that reviews of the meeting were delayed until now. There are a couple of interesting topics that emerged during the meeting that I’m going to explore in extended posts this week.

Today’s review looks at new breast cancer data from the conference. There were two things that stood out for me:

  • The role of epigenetics in advanced ER/PR+ breast cancer
  • New potential targets for inflammatory breast cancer (IBC)

A couple of articles in the latest Cancer Discovery looked at some rather promising, and perhaps a little unexpected, findings pertaining to epigenetic therapy.

What are epigenetics?

If you read up on epigenetics in the medical journals, you will come across some of the most dense and complex articles I’ve ever come across in cancer biology. That said, there are a few readable examples around such as Bird’s (2007) short insight piece in Nature.

Personally, I tend to think of epigenetics – in very simple terms – as changes in gene function that can occur without a change in the sequence of the DNA. This means that we see things such as DNA methylation (where something new is added) and gene silencing (where something important is somehow switched off or lost). A classic change in cancer that often appears in many tumour types is PTEN loss, for example.

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